asian

Yo Sushi

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Overview:

Japanese dishes taken from the belt or ordered from the open kitchen at a colourful chain eatery.

Information:

Address: 23 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10010

Phone:  (646) 781-8640

Neighborhood: Flatiron

Price: $$


 

Win Son

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Overview:

Casual spot for contemporary Taiwanese-American cooking, including buns, noodles & salads.

Information:

Address:159 Graham Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Phone: (347) 457-6010

Neighborhood: Bushwick

Price: $$-$$$


 

Vandal

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Overview

Lower Eastside club-restaurant from the Tao Group and chef Chris Santos. The space is massive, spanning multiple dining spaces and a downstairs club all decorated with sprawling colorful murals. You aren't really going there to eat, you're going there to party with a group. However, the menu is surprisingly  good considering it doesn't have to be. The kitchen dispenses elevated global street fare offered tapas-style. Much like Santos's other spots, there are creative takes on every dish like pretzel steak tartare, broccoli cheese soup dumps, sticky rice dumplings and crispy bao buns. 

Information:

Address: 199 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Phone:  (212) 400-0199

Neighborhood: Lower East Side

Price: $$$


 

Juku

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Overview:

Juku is a rather unique new venue that recently popped up in the heart of Chinatown. The multi level venue is actually three concepts in one. Art plays a big role in the design with commissioned works from New York-based artists as well as others around the world. You'll find a street-level izakaya for cocktails and casual bites and a not-yet-open vibey bar downstairs. A la carte options include traditional dishes like tonkatsu and karaage, as well as more modern interpretations like uni rice, fried chicken and egg custard. On the second floor there is a 12-seat omakase sushi bar headed up by Chef Kazuo Yoshida, former sushi chef at Williamsburg’s 1 or 8. The space is reservation-only and offers two menus, $80 for 12 pieces of sushi and $120 for 15 pieces and a hand roll.

Information:

Address:   32 Mulberry St, New York, NY 10013

Phone:  (646) 590-2111

Neighborhood: Chinatown

https://jukunyc.com

Price: $$$


 

Momofuku Nishi

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Overview:

Since opening in 2015 Momofuku Nishi has received mixed reviews and even briefly closed to revamp their concept recently. The decor in the space is exceptionally minimal, comfortable & sparsely decorated.  Food here is Asian & Italian fusion, heavily leaning on the Italian side. The menu is reasonably priced (by only NY standards) and they have adopted the trend of no tipping. You'll find imaginative starters like fried head on shrimp, Spanish mackerel toast with piquillo pepper & salsa verde, and beef carpaccio alla tonnato. The real star are the pastas, of which you will have lots to choose from, the best being spaghetti alla chitarra with maine uni & calabrian chili. 
A solid dining option that I trust it will only improve. 

Information:

Address:  232 Eighth Avenue, New York, NY 10011

Phone: (646) 518-1919

Neighborhood: Chelsea

Price: $$$


 

Little Tong Noodle Shop

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Overview

Little Tong is a compact, corner eatery from a chef who cut her teeth cooking at WD-50,  Simone Tong. The narrow, wood lined space is casual with some seating outside that is perfect for people watching in the East Village. Chinese mixian rice noodles are the focus here and are accompanied by small plates such as ghost pepper chicken, beef tartare with scallion pancake and pork wontons. Mixian is a style of fermented rice noodle which comes from the Chinese province of Yunnan. There are 4 distinctive options with interesting toppings like the Mala Dan Dan Mixian topped with ground pork, ya cai, pickled celery and mustard seeds, chili oil & peanuts. Dishes are all under $15 and they serve beer & wine as well. 

Information:

Address177 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10003

Phone: (929) 367-8664

Neighborhood: East Village

Price: $$-$$$


 

Jing Fong

Overview:

Not all Chinese food is created equal. Some, like Jing Fong, are better. The expansive Chinatown dim sum palace can serve up to 3k people per day, with 100's of menu items being pushes around on dim sum carts. They recently opened a second, smaller location in the Upper West Side that commands a crows as well. They offer every type of steamed, fried, baked and broiled options that your heart could ever desire. Their dumplings, turnip cakes and shrimp noodles are beyond excellent. Both locations are a fun place to take a big group and eat massive amounts of food extremely inexpensively. 

Information:

Address: 20 Elizabeth St, New York, NY 10013

380 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY 10024

Phone:    (212) 964-5256

Neighborhood: Chinatown, Upper West Side

Price: $$


 

Sushi By Bou


Overview:

What does a young Jewish guy from Boca Raton know about sushi? Apparently a whole lot. (Also $20 says every article about this guy starts with that sentence). David Boudhana trained in Japan and worked at Morimoto and Sushi Dojo before striking out on his own. He popularized the concept of a 30 minute omakase at Sushi on Jones before leaving to open Sushi by Bou. At both locations of his restaurant he offers an affordable12-piece, $50 omakase in under 30 minutes. The spaces are small (just 4 seats in Gansevoort market and 7 in midtown) and intimate. The chef chooses the menu which includes toro, uni, scallop, unagi, and wagu. The experience is unique and quick; definitely a nice way to treat yourself. 

Information:

Address: 353 W 14th St, New York, NY 10014

Sanctuary Hotel 132 W 47th St, New York, NY 10036

Phone:   (917) 870-1587

Neighborhood: Chelsea, Midtown West

Price: $$$


 

The Tang


Overview:

I really love Asian stuff and I really love The Tang. This hole in the wall East Village restaurant is great for a quick meal or delivery. The noodle bar serves noodles, wraps, and appetizers from various regions in China. Small plates include garlic pork dumplings, fried turnip cakes, chilled beef shanks and Sesame Tofu with salted mustard. The noodles are where it's at though - super chewy, huge portions, and in a slew of varieties. There are 8 variations including drunk noodles, dan dan, and sizzling noodles topped with a variety of proteins. 

Information:

Address: 120 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10009

Phone:  (646) 678-3092

Neighborhood: East Village

Price: $$


 

Ms. Yoo


Overview:

Ms. Yoo is a new club/restaurant from the owner of the always delicious Mokbar, Esther Choi. Choi named the place after her grandmother and the sleek space features a dining room, beautifully decorated bar, and large club space on the second level. The food is contemporary Korean gastropub fare. The snacks are addictive like nori popcorn, honey butter chips and squid fries. Choi makes an insanely gluttonous 10oz. burger smothered in kimchi bacon onion jam & american cheese. Finally, her take on mac & cheese is brilliant subbing out Korean rice cakes for noodles.  Portions are large and the food is heavy, so it's best to share as you make your way through their list of craft cocktails. 

Information:

Address: 163 Allen St, New York, NY 10002

Phone: (917) 261-2490

Neighborhood: Lower East Side   

Price: $$-$$$


 

Fuku


Overview

David Chang is expanding his empire and multiplying his fast casual concept, Fuku. The restaurant has outposts now in the East Village, Wall Street, MSG and Citi Field. The focus is chicken and there is certainly a fuck ton of it on the menu. Since expanding to Fidi, Chang also expanded his menu of chicken offerings. Items include a massive dark meat spicy fried chicken, sticky-sweet fuku fingers and a chicken dip with cucumbers & fiery sauce. The star is the amazing Chimek feast served with a whole fried chicken (1/2 habanero, 1/2 sweet & spicy), fries, pickled daikon, pickle chips, kimchi, all the sauces. Everything is super crave worthy, gluttonous and worth every calorie. 

Information:

Address  163 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10003

110 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

Neighborhood: East Village, Financial District 

Website: https://eatfuku.com/

Price: $


 

Cote


Overview

Cote is like an Asian meat palace. Restaurateur Simon Kim took the idea of humble Korean BBQ and elevated the concept into something chic. The space is minimalistic- high ceilings with clean lines and communal tables all outfitted with sunken grills. The meat is undeniably excellent and the selection is vast. Their staff expertly grills cuts of dry-aged and fresh meats like hanger steak and kalbi, or marinated short ribs.  They offer a la cart items but the star of the menu is the butcher’s feast arriving with prime beef with sides of ban chan, savory egg soufflé, kimchee and dwen-jang stew. 

Information:

Address  16 W 22nd St, New York, NY 10010

Phone:    (212) 401-7986

Neighborhood: Flatiron  

Website: https://www.cotenyc.com/

Price: $$$


 

Bessou


Overview

You should know about Bessou. The restaurant is located on Bleeker with an unassuming storefront and a stylishly decorated interior. The space feels Japanese- clean, contemporary & devout of too much fuss. I love the food. Not in a "it was good maybe I'd go back" kind of way; every single dish is great. The menu is not strictly Japanese but influenced by the owner’s childhood in New York and filled with variety. You'll find modern takes on sake steamed clams, crispy rice topped with fish, and chili oil cucumbers. There is a generous section of noodle dishes and rice including a chirashi bowl heaping with fish. Even the fried chicken is excellent, dusted in moroccan spices and served with kewpie potato salad & shiso tzatziki. This is an experience you should really have, at a price that makes it accessible.

Information

Address:  5 Bleecker St, New York, NY 10012

Phone : (212) 228-8502

Neighborhood: Noho

Website: http://bessou.nyc/

Price: $$$


 

Pinch Chinese


Overview

In case you were wondering, no, not all Chinese food was created equal. Like people, some Chinese food is better than others. Pinch is in that category. This is a new-ish Soho spot helmed by former executive chef for Din Tai Fung, Charlie Chen. The Taiwan-founded chain is Michelin starred, so the man knows a thing or two. True to Soho, the interior is sleek & dark. Dumplings are a focal point with many excellent versions being served - pork, chicken and seafood. After that the menu is a laundry list of deliciousness including dan dan noodles, mapo tofu, cumin ribs, and pork belly. The dumplings are excellent but the noodle & vegetable dishes are what would keep me coming back. 

Information

Address:  177 Prince St, New York, NY 10012

Phone:   (212) 328-7880

Neighborhood: Soho

Website: https://www.pinchchinese.com/

Price: $$


 

Catch

photo: catchrestaurants.com

photo: catchrestaurants.com


Information:

Address  21 9th Ave, New York, NY 10014

Phone:  (212) 392-5978

Neighborhood: Meatpacking   

Website : http://catchrestaurants.com/catchnyc/

Price: $$$

Attire: Trendy

Good for: seafood, outdoor dining, meeting your next sugar daddy, model watching, groups, birthdays, bachelorettes 

Overview

Catch probably needs no introduction. They have been one of the hottest restaurants in NYC & LA for years and show zero signs of slowing down. The massive trendy space spans 3 floors with a seasonal patio upstairs perfect for looking down on others, figuratively and literally. Contrary to many night life-esqu with all flash and no substance, the food at Catch is actually killer. It's one of the few places in Meatpacking I'll consent to eat. Crazy amounts of variety, wildly fresh, perfectly designed for splitting large amounts of food. I'd point you in the direction of the truffle sashimi, crispy shrimp, lobster mac n' cheese, and any of the sushi rolls. Great for a large group who wants to get loud in a dark, sexy restaurant. This place is like the epicenter of hot as fuck people, dress to impress.